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  • Modeling A Formula 1 Car In 3D

    [08.29.19]
    - Aditya Rajani

  • Step 3: Texturing

    Texturing is the most fun part for me. It's like a puzzle - trying to piece everything together. An average looking model can look great with the help of awesome textures but a great looking model can get ruined by mediocre looking textures. Establishing proper surface depth of materials is extremely important as it's the first thing people see when they look at a model.

    Adding small surface details like roughness variation, grunge, dirt, oil leaks, grease etc. can convey a lot of information and storytelling like how old a model is, what type of environment it was exposed to, whether that place is old or new, what type of weather an object went through etc. By adding details via textures, these questions can be answered automatically and gives the environment/object strong personality.

    For texturing this car, I used a combination of Quixel Suite and Substance Painter. I feel like both tools can be used to your advantage. Since there were a lot of sponsor logos that I had to put on, Substance Painter was the superior choice because of its easy interface. Quixel had a lot of good metal smart materials in their library at the time so I used it for texturing the main body. When using logos, it's important to make sure that the resolution is set to very high (at least 600 dpi), else the edges might appear jagged and can look very ugly.

    For adding normal wear and tear to a model in Substance Painter, smart masks can be a great starting point but it's important to not rely on them too much. It can look really robotic and rigid. For adding things like rust, studying an object that you're making can be really beneficial too. For example, if you're making a helmet, find reference images of a helmet exposed to natural surroundings and study the effects it has on it. If it's a place where it rains a lot, and the helmet was lying on the ground for years, then it's going to have even more wear and tear than usual. Pay close attention to the direction of the rust and try to replicate that on your 3D object.

    Step 4: Rendering

    Lighting and Rendering plays a vital role in presentation. It's essential to spend enough time presenting your work on your portfolio by choosing different camera angles that are pleasing to the eye. With the help of Marmoset Toolbag, it takes only a few mins to present high quality work thanks to its real-time rendering capabilities. For this project, I'm just using one directional light and an HDRI.


    For post-processing, I played around with Brightness, Contrast, Exposure and Gamma values until I was happy with the result. Showcasing how your model looks under different lighting conditions is also a good idea. Turntables can be quite effective in presenting the models in real-time. Breaking down your render shots shows an insight into your process and highlights different stages of production. It's always good to post different types of screenshots like AO only, Grayscale only and Wireframe to break it down further.

    Here is the finished product. Thanks for reading!

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